The Impersonators Bring Back Vintage-Pop with True Flair

Back with their forthcoming single ‘Sad Cafe’ out on March 22nd, The Impersonators are a two man project comprising of Tom Tikka and Antti Autio (lyricist) that flawlessly provide the depth of a full band. A treat for the fans of R.E.M, The Go-Betweens and Matthew Sweet, their previous releases ‘Broken Snow’ and ‘Burning Blue’ offer an abundance of sonic textures and ‘vintage’ pop rock sounds and their forthcoming track looks to be their best release yet.

Having grown in the States and being previously signed to Sony/BMG with Carmen Gray, one of Finland’s biggest-ever rock bands, Tom Tikka injects Finnish elements into his sound. ‘Burning Blue’ elicits this fusion in the intro’s accordion, with a tune that is essentially Scandinavian. Their forthcoming track ‘Sad Cafe’ also follows suit with the chorus melody. When writing the melody Tom drew influence from classic “schlager” tunes – tunes that were labelled by Benny Anderson of ABBA as “Pan European music”.

The inspiration behind ‘Sad Cafe’ was fueled by the universal hardships of relationships and the illusions we come under when ‘in love’ and The Impersonators accompany this perfectly with their trademark alt-pop melodies, honing in on the late 70’s sound of The Eagles – a track to watch for all cross-generation music lovers!

 Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/the-impersonators  

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNxEq8p5waRWe1Gp7DBAzCg

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ImpersonatorsBand/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/1mpersonators 

Hypnotherapist and Folk Music Innovator Elyssa Vulpes Promotes Self-Reflection and Spiritual Awareness in her Debut Album ‘Holding On, Letting Go’

Folk singer-songwriter Elyssa Vulpes releases her debut album ‘Holding On, Letting Go’ – an inspirational collective with lead tracks like Front Line and Charlene that exhibit genre cross-over and combines acoustic guitar and upbeat folk melodies with elements of indie-pop and Americana resulting in a modern take on traditional folk.

Inspired by the shamanic concepts of reaching altered states of consciousness, Elyssa searched for a modern equivalent – leading to her occupation as a professional hypnotherapist. The folk artist’s concentration on the psychology of self healing radiates through her music and allows a spiritual depth to her sound that isn’t commonly found.

Often categorised as a folk artist, Elyssa concentrates more on the lyrical content of the songs and enforces that she wants to be free to fit the music to the message rather than try and squeeze it into a marketable genre box. Her aim to write songs that speak to the soul and touch people in a non-superficial way is led by her emphasis on dealing with negative and uncomfortable emotions and her method of avoiding the notion that we must repress these emotions and instead promoting expression of these emotions through art, coupling this with reflection.

Drawing from her Italian roots with her love for melody and storytelling but also celebrating the Celtic folk influences of her new home in Edinburgh, Elyssa’s music evokes cultural variances that make her sound unique and offer the listener a feeling of empowerment, accompanied with the contentment that folk music often elicits.

Click on the links below to listen more:

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/elyssa

Twitter: https://twitter.com/elyssavulpes

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyFN-8QTsLgu38Bk71kd0iw

Website: https://www.elyssavulpes.com/

 

 

2Nice Interview!

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1 – When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

  • 2Nice singer/rapper from London I started my musical career at the tender age of 12. Working at local recording studios and was schooled by my Father, As well as UK Reggae legends. My main inspirations at the time was my older brother and local artist & community sound systems.

2 – Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

  • I grew up listening to Super Cat, Notorious B.I.G,Bob Marley, Wu-Tang Clan,Dennis Brown, Black Uhuru, Jay-Z , Nas,Fugeess to name a few. I think listening to such a broad span of artists from such a young age helped with my song writing as a singer/rapper plus staying versatile concering different generes. Also a performer having such a diverse background keeps topped up with ideas if i’ve got to play live with a live band or with a DJ.

3 – How long have you been playing/writing?

  • I’ve been playing & writing my own songs for over 20 years now.

4 – How often do you play live (include details and links for any upcoming gigs)?

  • Just some of the festivals 2NICE will be at this summer 2015 Glastonbury, Boomtown & One Love to name a few.

5 – What has been your favourite moment in music?

  • My favourite moment in my music was in 2009 picking up UK Unsigned Best Reggae Act Award Winner. It happend at a time where a took a positive turn music was getting a great reception both in Europe and the Carribean.

6 – Where is the best place to find you online?

All This Noise Q&A with James

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1 – When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

  • From a very early age. Assorted rock compilation albums featuring the likes of Thin Lizzy, Deep Purple and Motörhead are the first things I remember making me want to pick up a guitar.

2 – Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

  • I went through a phase in my early teens of mainly listening to classic stuff from the sixties and seventies like The Kinks, The Who, Beatles, Bowie etc. I think at some level they’ve all really influenced how I go about writing lyrics and vocal melodies. Radiohead are who really turned me onto modern alternative music. They really influenced my guitar playing and pushed me towards listening to a lot more electronic music.

3 – How long have you been playing/writing?

  • Oh ages. From about 13 years old I started getting at least a vague idea of how to play the guitar.

4 – How often do you play live (include details and links for any upcoming gigs)?

5 – What has been your favourite moment in music?

  • Playing a small impromptu gig with one of my old bands at a small and crazy Greek bar on Latimer road. We were first on but other acts included Snow Patrol, The Magic Numbers and Ed Harcourt.

6 – Where is the best place to find you online?

ToyFace Interview

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When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

Tamsyn:

  • I was 13 when I bought my first proper record, which was Live Through This by Hole. I bought it whilst I was spending a couple of weeks at a friends house whilst my mum was away. We’d never heard anything like it before and I remember us just hanging out of her window feeling euphoric listening to Courtney Love singing ‘And the sky was made of amethysts…’ and shrieking looking up at the sky and down into the street.

James:

  • I first properly became interested in music at school when I met some like minded friends who were up for playing music together. We listened to all sorts of music to begin with, from psychedelic 60’s stuff to Grunge, hip-hop and funk and everything else in between. I had piano lessons since I was young which was extremely useful. I was able to apply my knowledge of classical piano to the jams that we were having which made everything quite experimental and exciting. 

 Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

James:

  • I grew up listening to everything, some of it was terrible! But the music that stayed with me is very important to me. Bands like Nirvana, The Fall and Joy Division. Since I was very young I’ve listened to the big 60’s stars like Hendrix, Nina Simone and James Brown. Massive Attack have always been a huge influence too, as it seems that you can’t escape it here in Bristol, their influence is everywhere and its amazing to witness that.

Tamsyn:

  • It might sound weird, but I can’t see a definite link between much of what I grew up listening to and how it impacts me now. I’ve always enjoyed music, I started paying more attention to it as a teenager, but it wasn’t until I was an adult that I started making music, and even now at 29 years old after singing for the last seven or eight years, is it that I really am starting to feel a bit more like a musician who is really paying attention to the separate elements that make up a song.

 How long have you been playing/writing?

James:

  • Since I started playing piano so 18 years. 

Tamsyn:

  • I’ve been writing since I was a child, but it wasn’t until I was about 21 that I started actually turning what I was writing into songs. I’ve been making music for about seven or eight years.

How often do you play live (include details and links for any upcoming gigs)?

Tamsyn:

  • I play live sporadically. I gig quite a bit last year with a couple of different guitarists who learned songs I’d written on guitar or stuff I’ve written with James. It gave me some more freedom to keep doing shows even if James was busy with other bands that he’s in.
  • Now that we’ve just made a record though, we are pretty on it with doing shows together as a whole band. Our album launch in Bristol is at a place called the old malt house and its this Friday, April 24. Then we have another London album launch on May 17 at a place called the magic garden in Battersea. We are also playing as a band at Farm Fest, and as a trio at Shambala, boomtown fair, how the light gets in Festival and Bestival.
  • https://www.facebook.com/events/932021910152289/
  • https://www.facebook.com/events/364344263752624/


James:

  • Usually about 3 times a week. I am a self employed musician and performing live is what I make most my money doing.

What has been your favourite moment in music?

Tamsyn:

  • Today was pretty good! we’ve got a really great new bass player and we were in the rehearsal room arranging a new song together. It’s a really bonkers intense song, both lyrically and musically. I felt like I was kind of prowling around the room and then I pause and just watch the guys just smashing out these nuts and rhythms and melodies and James is just hammering the keys so fast. It’s those moments that as someone who feels like they only just qualify as a musician, just kind of blow your mind and make you feel super privileged to be able to be there amongst it all. I think we all felt it though, the room just felt like it was shaking and we were all just kind of buzzing and exhausted at the end as if we’ve been doing am kind of chaotic jazz workout. Working on new material when it’s going well is basically just the best feeling ever.

James:

  • I studied music at Leeds University, and they had a competition for young composers. The prize was getting one of your compositions scored for a 40 piece orchestra. I submitted a piano piece, and it got chosen to be scored. I’ll never forget watching the orchestra; it was amazing to hear 15 violins playing lines that I had only heard through playing it myself on the piano in my bedroom!  

Where is the best place to find you online?

Aubrey Whitfield Interview

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1 – When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

  •  I can’t explain it but I could just write music from an early age without any guidance or instrumental ability. I’d constantly make up little songs or jingles and get my brother and cousins to sing different parts. Then when I was 11 I got a Casio keyboard for Christmas and my dad taught me a few chords. By that evening I had written my first proper song and performed it to my mum and nan. I then got the bug and wrote around 500 songs between the age of 11 and 19.

2 – Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

  •  My parents always had 60s and 70s music playing when I was growing up. I remember Queen being played a lot. It was a very musical household. My songwriting has always been influenced by songs rather than artists. So when I heard ‘Roll With It’ by Oasis on Top of the Pops I remember picking up my guitar right away and wanting to write a song like that.  That’s still my songwriting process now. When I heard ‘Love Me Like You Do’ by Ellie Goulding I went straight to my guitar to write a song. It’s quite an inspiring process for me.

3 – How long have you been playing/writing?

  •  I have been writing songs since I was 11, so that’s about 24 years now. I learnt to play the keyboard when I was 11 and then the guitar when I was 15. I also dabbled with the saxophone and cello in my late teens.

4 – How often do you play live (include details and links for any upcoming gigs)?

  • Playing live for any artist in this modern music era is so important to build a fanbase. So I’m trying to get out and perform live as often as I can – I aim for an open-mic night per month and a pre-booked gig per month. I would love to do much more! I’m playing at The Bedford in Balham, South London on Monday 18 May. I’m really looking forward to that one as it’s somewhere I’ve always wanted to play given the calibre of musicians who have performed there before they were famous.

5 – What has been your favourite moment in music?

  • In 2012 I signed a publishing deal with Broken Music Publishing. I did a couple of dance remixes for an American artist called Electron Love Theory. I think getting an email from the publishing company saying that my remix (so my first ever release) had been playlisted on over 60 dance radio stations and clubs worldwide was a stand out moment for me.

6 – Where is the best place to find you online?