We Talk To Brazilian Jazz Fusion Pianist Ricardo Bacelar Just In Time For The Release Of His Brand New Album ‘Sebastiana’

 

 

Multi-instrumentalist Ricardo Bacelar has recently released his brand new album ‘Sebastiana’, a collection of sounds influenced by different musicians, and instruments. However, the main theme is seemingly Brazilian, which suits, as leading man Ricardo is from Fortaleza in Brazil.

We got the chance talk to Ricardo about the life he has lived leading up to this time, and how he feels about where he is now:

Q: At what age did you start to really take music seriously, When did you know that’s what you wanted to do? 

A: The piano has always been very present in my life since childhood. My father plays the piano and used to sit me on his lap to play with him since I was a baby. I started studying music at the age of 5 and after studying harmony, ‘still an adolescent’, I began to accompany some Brazilian singers. The music began to take up a lot of space in my life and I was gradually entering the world of recording studios and concerts.

Q: What has inspired you most throughout your career? 

A: Keith Jarret, who opened my mind to wide improvisation, a specific training that promotes its creativity. The second one is Chick Corea, which mixes various colours and influences, creating an environment with a lot of personality. The last one is the Brazilian Egberto Gismonti.

Q: Over the years, what has proven to be difficult or challenging?

A: I understand that coherence and discourse are important pillars. I understand that the musician should not remain in a comfortable zone. They need to push their boundaries, recycle, advance in their studies, and try to record discs that have pre-set concepts that bring together elements that add value to their music.

Q: And finally, as a musician, what is your definition of success?

A: Success is being able to touch what you like and have a faithful audience. In fact, success is not what you do, but what you did.

 

Spotify: http://bit.ly/Sebastiana-Spotify

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ricbacelar/videos

Facebook: https://facebook.com/ricbacelar

Instagram: https://instagram.com/ricardo_bacelar

Website: http://bit.ly/RicardoBacelar-Sebastiana-en


			

Its Make Or Break For Wicked Empire

 

A DJ, a producer, a writer, composer, performer and lastly US military man.

Christopher Dickinson is a dedicated music enthusiast, who doesn’t let being in the middle east hold him back from following his dream.

When asked about how he balances his work life between music life, he replied “I usually get off work at 17:00-18:00 at night, and ill go into my room for 4 or 5 hours, creating, experimenting, practicing”. This easily shows how committed he is with this simple statement. However, this is no call for sympathy. His drive and love for music and the immense respect he has for his favourite artists is immense.

“One of my biggest influences when it comes to creating my music, would be Skrillex and Alan walker. I’m trying to experiment and become my own”. 

It is clear that this man, has now got his eyes set the prize that is full time music making, hopeful of leaving the army.

Be sure to check it out:

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/wickedempire
YouTube: Youtube.com/c/wickedempiremusic
Facebook: Facebook.com/wickedempiremusic1
Instagram: Instagram.com/wicked.empire_
Website: wickedempire.org

 

Interview: Nej!Las Speaks To Us About Her Love For Music, And More

We spoke to Techno/Electric house artist, Nej!Las, about her love of music and her take on the Tech/Electro House scene at the moment.

:Tech/Electro house is a specific but interesting scene, what were some of the things that attracted you to playing this type of music? 

Nej!Las: The ability (and even the requirement) to make, not only harmonic melodies and bass lines, but to additionally have percussion and drums that could, by themselves, carry a song. Techno/electro/house pushes the envelope by requiring and allowing for creativity in all areas of a song. It requires one to constantly innovate and come up with new, original, creations and techniques applied to the production. 

 

:In Chicago, where your based, what is your local scene like? do you feel that you fit in? 

Nej!Las: The Detroit Techno scene is so prominent; it created its own genre. The Detroit Techno Militia shows the attitude of techno producers that reside in Detroit – independent, proud and original. Detroit allows for producers to have creativity, to not necessarily fit inside the box of what “techno” is supposed to be, but to continuously push the boundaries of the genre. 

 

:Do you have a writing process or any other special way you approach your music or performance?

Nej!Las: The first live set – the “progressive, melodic set” focuses on the harmonic elements. This set, by itself, would be categorized as “progressive” music. I tend to favour an almost guitar-like synth – overdriven and raw. I then, likewise, formulate an “opposite” synth that is sweet and melodic – as if it could lead a progressive/chill-out song.

The second set – the “techno” set focuses solely on drums and percussion. I likewise arrange a very heavy techno arrangement from an intro to an outro. Hardware, like the Alesis SamplePad 4, is very useful to continue to create original midi data, or even audio samples, for percussion.  

In the end, I combine the two sets, which could, by themselves, be sufficient for a song, into one set that has movement and free flowing segments

 

: And finally, what is your overall aim, what do you want for you and your music? 

Nej!Las: To continue to innovate and bring original music into the traditional “techno” genre. I want to create a niche of original, harmonic, progressive, techno songs that play, and sound, like a live set.

 

Soundcloud:  https://soundcloud.com/nejlasproducing

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NejlasProducing/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/nejlasProducing

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nejlasproducing/

Website: http://nejlas.com

Reverbnation: http://www.reverbnation.com/rpk/nejlas

Reverbnation: https://www.reverbnation.com/nejlas 

 

 

 

In Conversation With…Mihail Doman

What attracted you to the specific area of classical music you work in?

I grew up listening to Jean Michel Jarre, Vangelis and Klaus Schulze – I’ve always liked the electronic music of those times (70s and 80s). And I wanted to write some music in that vein, but as it turns out things changed, and so did the aesthetics. Today that sort of music would seem a bit too simplistic or outdated. I
felt that this kind of “modern” classical music – the kind Neoclassical artists like Olafur Arnalds write – is today’s equivalent to, you know, the “medditative” electronic music that I was listening to. And today’s Soundtrack music is getting even closer to that. So it all kind of pulled me in this direction, naturally.

What is your local music scene like in Romania? How do you think you fit in?

The local scene in Romania is almost non-existent for the kind of music I write. There’s a pretty good Rock music scene, but Classical meets Electronic is something very rare. I actually don’t know anyone who plays this kind of music.
I think it’s a bit early to tell you how I fit in. Ask me in a year’s time 😛

You’ve got a huge concert lined up – what would be your dream venue?

My dream venue would actually be a public square. Something like what Jean Michel Jarre did with the “Concert Pour La Tolerance” or “Houston – A City In Concert”. Something big with lights, fireworks, a lot of extras (dancers etc), a big orchestra and a lot of people.
You know, the kind of concert you organize only once a few years, but people remember for a few years too.

https://mihaildoman.com/

Tell us about how you go about creating your music, from initial idea to completion.

I first create the theme on the piano. For Arhythmology it was a very basic thing in Em, which you can hear all-through-out the album.
After that, I create a rough draft in Reaper, so I have something to prepare the strings to.

Then comes the sound design part – probably the best part. There’s a lot of Native Instruments (Absynth, Reaktor, Massive), but more recently I’ve been using U-HE plugins (Hive and Dark Zebra). Very easy to use and light weight 🙂

I usually like to do my own sounds, so a lot of times I start with an empty sound, like just a basic Sine or Saw wave.

Next is the string orchestra. Hopefully on the next albums I’ll be able to use a live orchestra, but for now it was Native Instruments’ Session Strings, along with a really old East West Quantum Leap Library that I had lying around, to give it a bigger size 🙂 Programming the strings is a super tedious work, because you basically have to write every note manually for every individual voice. And afterwards you have to tweak the velocity and the sample sounds until you have something that sounds natural. And this is not mentioning that you have to respect some basic rules of musical harmony – although working in E minor is not that hard. Playing the bass for a few years certainly helped me with this.

The last part I’m involved is mixing. I use almost exclusively only Waves plugins. There’s nothing better on the market. And their analog emulations are great. There’s a lot of CLA compressors on every track (especially LA-2A), API eqs, Vcomps and some tape saturation from the Kramer series. But I also use their modern plugins like the C1 and C4 Compressor, their really good sounding IR-L Convolution Reverb, or the H-Delay.

And after this, I export some basic stems and it’s off to mastering, where Marian Nica – the engineer I worked with on Arhythmology – also did some basic mixing first, to get it to sound just right.

Tell us about the inspiration and making of the video which accompanies the album

The video was inspired by Boticelli’s “Birth of Venus”, but with a modern twist – if you wish. I didn’t really want to make a video of me playing the piano – because who would watch that, really!

I thought of creating something like a painting, you know, something which will express my ideas and would be another complex creative endeavour.
I don’t want to get too much into the details of what the story means, because that would ruin the fun, but I can say there’s an underlying esoteric element to the film. To some people it will probably be obvious.

But I only had a concept to work with – I needed someone with an artistic vision. And this is where the director and producer – Matei Sopterean – stepped in. He’s a young guy, but he’s been working in the film industry in Romania for some years and he does know his stuff. He came up with the idea that we should have a choreography, and the different stances fo the main character. And he’s the one who also beautifully shot the scenes.

Now, the choreography was done by Stefan Lupu – an actor working at The Little Theatre in Bucharest. He had a very special chemistry with the actress – Alina Petrica, and they put together something really good.

It was quite the project – with a team of around 15 people, shot with a 5k Red Pro camera, in a studio, with cranes and everything else needed.
My role was more that of a consultant, but most of the merit goes to the director who put together a fantastic team of artists.

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Well, I don’t really aspire to be part of the industry. I would like to flirt with it a bit, but ultimately, my goal is to do something like what Jean Michel Jarre did. My approach to all of this is probably closer to someone working for the United Nation, than to that of a musician.
What I want to do is to write “humanitarian” music. It sounds kind of funny, but I guess this is the term I would use. I want my music to change people, touch people and why not, help to create a New World.
I know I’m an idealist, but I think in life one should be idealistic. There are too many cynics around these days.

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

I think I’ve said it all in the description of the album: https://mihaildoman.com/press-kit/

 

In Conversation with…Nej!Las

What attracted you to the techno/electro/house scene?

The ability (and even the requirement) to make, not only harmonic melodies and bass lines, but to additionally have percussion and drums that could, by themselves, carry a song. Techno/electro/house pushes the envelope by requiring and allowing for creativity in all areas of a song. It requires one to constantly innovate and come up with new, original, creations and techniques applied to the production.

What is your local music scene like? How do you think you fit in?

The Detroit Techno scene is so prominent; it created its own genre. The Detroit Techno Militia shows the attitude of techno producers that reside in Detroit – independent, proud and original. Detroit allows for producers to have creativity, to not necessarily fit inside the box of what “techno” is supposed to be, but to continuously push the boundaries of the genre. Detroit Techno is innovative. The innovative and original style shines through my music.

You’ve got a huge gig lined up – what would be your dream venue?

An intimate venue where I could feed off of the audiences’ energy and they could be up close and personal to my live production. A symbiotic relationship between me and the crowd.

Tell us about how you go about creating your music, from initial idea to completion

I create two different live sets.
The first live set – the “progressive, melodic set” focuses on the harmonic elements. This set, by itself, would be categorized as “progressive” music. I spend days creating and manipulating analogs, wavetables, and filters in order to find a unique synth sound. I tend to favour an almost guitar-like synth – overdriven and raw. I then, likewise, formulate an “opposite” synth that is sweet and melodic – as if it could lead a progressive/chill-out song. This synth tends to be a string or rubber instrument. I then spend additional days writing, rewriting, and rearranging midi data and appreciations. With all the variations of synths and midi, I usually have enough sounds and tracks to form an entire arrangement. This is the next step, to formulate all the melodies into an arrangement of a harmonic song from an intro to an outro.

The second set – the “techno” set focuses solely on drums and percussion. I likewise arrange a very heavy techno arrangement from an intro to an outro. Hardware, like the Alesis SamplePad 4, is very useful to continue to create original midi data, or even audio samples, for percussion. I want this second set to be able to stand alone as a song without bass or melodies.

In the end, I combine the two sets, which could, by themselves, be sufficient for a song, into one set that has movement and free flowing segments. I arrange the set to make it play as if I were playing it live. I even record all the modulations and envelopes from a MIDI controller (the AKAI MPC40) as if I were performing it live. This “live performance” of the song becomes the final track.

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

To continue to innovate and bring original music into the traditional “techno” genre. I want to create a niche of original, harmonic, progressive, techno songs that play, and sound, like a live set.

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Songs like “Fini” play like a live set, except it allows one to listen to it anywhere. That is the style of my production – to have harmonic synths that could stand by themselves as a progressive song, but on top of the harmonies, to have percussion and drums that could also be sufficient for a song. The music is “alive”, always changing and morphing into something new and creative.

Check out Nej!Las here:

https://soundcloud.com/nejlasproducing

http://nejlas.com

 

Get to Know: Voldo Blanka

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Electro-pop connoisseur and craftsman Voldo Blanka kindly had a little chat with us to tell us where his unique brand of music comes from. You can listen to ‘Go Your Way’ here:

 

When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

I’ve been playing music since diapers, and playing in bands since I had terribly filthy long dyed black hair in jr. high, but it wasn’t till later I knew this would be what I was going to do with my life.

I went to coachella alone in 2007. First time I’d ever been to a festival like that. Rage Against the Machine reunited and I really dug into electronic music. From that day I knew there was ONLY one thing I’d do with my life. And that is to make records and play live.

I had a few projects on the go but the one that broke was my last band Head of the Herd. We were the first band in our country to have a #1 song without a label and that taught me everything I know – making the music YOU want to make, and standing by that.

Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

I grew up in a house with a lot of jazz, classical and rock n roll. And while the latter took over my life, you can’t discount how everything you hear creeps into your own creations.

So I’ve been making rock n roll since I was a boy and film scores for the past few years. The combination of those two makes up Voldo Blanka and the record ‘nuns enjoy a madman.’

 

How often do you play live?

I’m keeping off the road for the moment. Few videos and films being worked on. But when I hit the road, it’ll get announced on the Voldo Blanka Facebook page.

 

What has been your favourite moment in music?

There’s no feeling on earth like when people sing along to your songs live. It’s surprising, beautiful, uplifting, and terrifying every time. Fuck, I just love it.

 

Where is the best place to find you online?

Go to www.voldoblanka.com and sign up for the email list but Facebook and Instagram are where most of the updates come from.

Soundcloud: https://tinyurl.com/yczk5ewq

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/voldoblanka/?hc_ref=SEARCH&fref=nf

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/voldoblanka/?hl=en

Thanks for having me out. Now play that record as loud as you can!

Introducing: The Outside Illusion

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Unsigned Interviews got up close and personal with Brazilian guitar band, the Outside Illusion’s lead man, Denis Salgado. The band have recently released their new album Silent Communication which empowers the ethics of instrumental music. Check out what he had to say below:

When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

I first got into music when I was 11. I asked my father to teach me a song he was playing on his acoustic guitar (Day Tripper by The Beatles). I was so excited about learning the riff that I couldn’t  put down the guitar that day until I had learnt it and could play the whole thing – I didn´t even know how to hold a guitar pick. Next day, when I got back from school, I was completely in love with the possibility of becoming a real guitar player, so I spent the whole afternoon practicing that unique riff again. I think also there was a wish of  impressing my father. Anyway, after that, I’ve never stopped playing the guitar (now an electric one). I can say my father was my main inspiration at that moment.  

Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

There are so many artists and bands. I used to listen to Eric Clapton, Dire Straits, a-ha, and Michael Jackson at the age of 4. It was around 1986/87 and again influenced by my father, who also introduced me to Queen, Elton John, George Michael, Tina Turner and Phil Collins. My favorite concert at the age of 5 was “The Prince’s Trust”, which I used to watch on a Laser Disc Player. But there´s one band who have impacted me in every way. From their music to the way of doing business: Iron Maiden. They are a kind of guide to me, since I was 11, 12 years old, until now. They have had and continue to have a great influence on the musician I am today. Some other metal bands have influenced me a lot, like Blind Guardian, Symphony X, Dream Theater (their first albums) and guitar players like Adrian Smith, Yngwie Malmsteen, Steve Vai… just to name a few. Apart from all these artists and bands, Electronic Music is a universe which also influences me a lot. I really like listening to DJ Marky, Zedd, Robin Schulz, Skrillex and some other talented guys.

How long have you been playing/writing?

I have been playing since I was 11. But the first song I wrote was when I was 20, more or less. 

How often do you play live (include details and links for any upcoming gigs)?

I love being on stage. But at the moment I´m concentrating on recording the new promotional videos. I´m setting up new dates from October/November. Probably around 10 dates in different areas of my state, São Paulo.  I am ready to go anywhere in the globe and can´t wait to come back to the UK.  I was in the UK a year ago for a very special event, which resulted in me creating a very special 28 min documentary, available on Outside Illusion´s Youtube Channel.  

What has been your favourite moment in music?

My first international gig in Guernsey. June/2016. The very best and happiest moment in my career until this moment.

Where is the best place to find you online?

www.facebook.com/theoutsideillusion

www.youtube.com/theoutsideillusion

www.theoutsideillusion.com

Spotify / Deezer / Google Play: The Outside Illusion 

Instagram: denis_outside_illusion

 

Watch the video for ‘Silent Communciation’ here:

 

 

GET TO KNOW: Atticus

When did you first get into music? What or who Inspired you?

I was into songwriting from an early age, almost by accident. My first memory of it was primary school. We were doing a song in class the next day and the teacher asked if anyone could play the guitar. Nobody put there hand up so I did. I thought, how hard can it be? Turns out it was hard and I stayed up well past my bedtime learning the song on my mums old guitar. I later taught myself piano and the basics of production.

When my mum died at 16 my music really kicked on as I put down on paper all of the confusion I was feeling at that point. The emotion that drove that music is still very much prevalent in what I make now. Only the way in which I create has evolved.

 

Who did you grow up listening to, and does that impact on what you create now?

As with many people my parents were a big influencer on what I listened to. I still remember the 6 cd changer in my dads car. Bowie, beautiful south and Fleetwood mac (‘roomers’ of course). Bowie certainly influenced my style, in the staccato way in which I compose, allowing raw vocals plenty of space to cut through. My dad was into a lot of bluesy indie back then so I know I’ve adopted and modernised that style.

 

How long have you been playing/writing?

I’ve been writing for almost a decade now, feels a bit strange to say. This project (ATTICUS) though is brand-new and super exciting, I feel like it’s the music that I’ve always wanted to make. It’s been such a journey, working with some amazing people along the way, i’m so grateful and I just can’t wait to get the music out there.

 

How often do you play live (include details and links for any upcoming gigs)?

At the moment we are seeding the music out online, but I love playing live so when the EP drops, there will be plenty of gigs in and around London and maybe a tour.

 

What has been your favourite moment in music?

Quite a few years back I played at the 02 arena. The thrill of playing to a crowd like that was intoxicating.

 

Where is the best place to find you online?

My debut track as ATTICUS lands on 24 March, when that drops you wont be able to miss it; Spotify, YouTube, Apple, Soundcloud. The best place to follow me is my Facebook @officialatticus.